Nancy Grogan

The Enemy of the Good

A key principle of Catholic teaching is the idea that there are some moral issues which are more important than all others.[1]  There are definitive and undiluted principles, a hierarchy of evils, under which murder is classified as a more serious sin than theft, and abortion is worse than deceit.  Catholics are to avoid the more serious evils, and they… Read more →

What We Catholics Believe About Gun Violence

In times of uncertainty, clear direction seems difficult to find. As media consumers, we get caught up in the minutiae of debate and opinion on every conceivable topic, including gun violence. American Catholics have both privileges and responsibilities, as people of faith in a nation which recognizes and upholds the Second Amendment.  Perhaps it is useful at times like these… Read more →

Gun Violence Challenge Should Be a Prominent Feature of Church’s Ministry – by Marvin Lim and Nancy Grogan

As Catholics who are committed to understanding the relationship between the Catholic social ethic and the most pressing and timely issues in American society, we applaud National Catholic Reporter’s series dedicated to coverage of the gun violence crisis. We write to call on American Catholics, the clergy and the lay, to consider this issue – whatever their intuitions may already… Read more →

BOOK REVIEW

  MSN reported last week that an arms maker in Florida is now marketing a Christian-themed gun. [1] The “Cruzado” is inscribed with the cross of the Knights Templar, a religious order that fought in the Crusades, along with an Old Testament psalm. A company spokesman reported that the company sold out of the rifles in the first 72 hours,… Read more →

   More than the fire hoses and the police dogs of Bull Connors (Chief of Police of Birmingham, AL), I fear the silence of the churches.  The contemporary church is so often a weak, ineffective voice with an uncertain sound.  It is so often the arch-supporter of the status-quo.  Far from being disturbed by the presence of the church, the power structure of the average community is consoled by the church’s silent and vocal sanction of things as they are.  But the judgment of God is upon the church as never before.  If the church of today does not recapture the sacrificial spirit of the early church, it will lose its authentic ring, forfeit the loyalty of millions, and be dismissed as an irrelevant social club with no meaning for the 20th century.  I am meeting young people everyday (sic) whose disappointment with the church has risen to outright disgust.”

 

– Martin Luther King, Letters From a Birmingham Jail, 12